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Mora Blog 9

Based on the textbook, the music and dance of the Mevlevi is known as the “belief in a universal God with whom it is possible experience direct spiritual union” (315). In other words, it is a spiritual connection with God which effects your connection with your soul in a positive way. This music and dance was honored by Mevlana Celeladdin Rumi who was a Persian poet and a philosopher. The Sema ceremony signifies the connection with God, “enacts a soul’s passage to God” (315). This ceremony consists of many body movements, each representing something. For instance, the arms are opened outward and then the right palm facing upward signifies the arrival of God’s blessing. The left palm facing downward represents the power into the earth. The instruments being used in the ceremony are a flute which is known as the Neyzen, Kettledrumer and a Cymbal player. Overall the purpose of this music and dance is to express emotion, love, towards God.

Music in the early Christian church is also similar to the Mevlevi music and dance. Most of the chants presented in the mass were from monks, nuns and monasteries etc. The only difference here is that the chants were performed in voice alone in order to represent God’s perfect instrument. The plainchant of Kyrie eleison is written in Greek language. Kyrie eleison stands for “Lord have mercy”. Based on the textbook, the “e” on the word “eleison” is more stretched out in order to transmit the spiritual message (297). Both of these traditions share the similarity of the strong belief and connection with God.


2 Comments

  1. Hi, I found your blog interesting to read as I discussed about a different musical ceremony that is different from Mevlevi ceremonies. It was interesting to find out how Mevlevi’s can be compared to the Christian church. However I did not know about the correlation of the left palm during Mevlevi’s ceremonies, that it represented power “into the earth”.

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